Sarcasm does Cellini (with a tutorial!)

oral surgery

Ok, I had oral surgery Tuesday, so I am NOT in the best, or for that matter, the straightest frame of mind. (Thank you pharmaceutical industry for pain meds!) Fasten your seatbelt folks, cuz this is going to be short, sweet, and to the point this week. I gotta go lay down! Butttt, since I was stuck at home unable to drive, due to those marvelous wonders we call pain pills, I did manage to get some beading done!

im-sorry-goose-oral-surgery-sucks

In addition to working on some new projects of my own, I decided to see what all the fuss was about with Jill Wiseman’s Wave Crest pendant that you can only get the kit for on JTV. Well, JTV has been sold out of their kits for like, forever, so Jill, being the super wonderful nice person that she is, went ahead and released the how-to video on Youtube and just kind of left it up to the viewer to figure out what beads to use. I did just that. 😀 Another thing you can do to learn Jill’s beautiful techniques? Pick up a copy of her book, “Jill Wiseman’s Beautiful Beaded Ropes: 24 Wearable Jewelry Projects in Multiple Stitches (Beadweaving Master Class Series)” at your nearest book retailer or online. You won’t be sorry you did. It is an A.WE.S.O.M.E. book!

My version (and I’m not specifying bead sizes out of respect for Jill and JTV’s publishing rights) uses copper firepolish beads, matte teal, matte tea rose AB, galvanized metallic chocolate, blue zircon, and Navajo white seed beads. I will say this, the only thing that makes this different from a regular Cellini spiral is just one teeny tiny little trick. You can find Jill’s how-to video here. Other than watching to see what that little trick was, I basically did it on my own, because I just am not a video learner. All that stopping and starting and rewinding and fast forwarding gives me a headache. I’m a visual learner. I look at something, visualize the thread path, and then just do it. Anywho, here is my version.

"Wave Crest" by Becca Scott - Design by Jill Wiseman
“Wave Crest” by Becca Scott (Design by Jill Wiseman)

watermarked-shanks

So this is just based on basic Cellini spiral principles. Need some pointers on how to do one, or just a refresher? Well, here ya go! The Cellini spiral, named after a famed 16th-century Italian artist of dubious reputation and immense talent, is a really fun and creative way to do spiral peyote.

The basic technique for making a Cellini spiral is the same as creating a piece of tubular peyote stitch: pick up an odd/even number of beads, tie them in a ring, and start working in tubular peyote stitch. What gives Cellini spiral it’s characteristic undulation is the variation in bead sizes used to make the tube. Yes, it really IS that simple! It can be worked in either even or odd-count tubular peyote stitch. If you decide to use even-count tubular peyote stitch, don’t forget to make the step-up at the end of each round. That’s another thing that makes the Cellini so darn easy: the step-up is always in the same bead! When working in odd-count peyote stitch, the work will just spiral around to infinity, with no need to make a step-up.

The most important thing to remember about doing a Cellini, and I can not stress this to you enough, is your thread TENSION! It is absolutely crucial for your spiral to look presentable and your beads to spiral correctly and lay against each other they way they are supposed to. Because it requires such a sturdy tension, I recommend you use at least a 6 or 8lb Fireline or Wildfire. Put your Nymo, and all those other softer, stretchier threads away for this, because you need something sturdy.

The other key thing to remember? The main thing about a Cellini spiral is that no matter what your bead combination, whether you are doing even or odd count, you will ALWAYS feed the same bead you are coming out of into the next bead. Doesn’t matter what color or size, this is always, always, given in a Cellini, and what makes it so freaking easy!

Four Bead Combinations for Cellini Spiral

Ready to give it a try? Here are four easy variations of Cellini peyote spiral for you to play with!

Copper Spine: Start each spiral with 13 beads as follows:Copper Spine

  • 2 dark blue size 8 seed beads
  • 2 light blue size 8 seed beads
  • 2 purple size 11 seed beads
  • 2 light blue size 8 seed beads
  • 2 purple size 11 seed beads
  • 2 green size 8 seed beads

 

Raspberry Raspberry Spiral: Start each spiral with 12 beads:

  • 5 peach lined size 11 seed beads
  • 3 matte raspberry size 8 seed beads
  • 2 rose lined size 6 seed beads
  • 2 matte raspberry size 8 seed beads
  • 1 copper size 6 seed bead

 

 

Black crystal Black Crystal Spine: Start each spiral with 13 beads:

  • 1 black 4mm crystal
  • 2 green size 8 seed beads
  • 2 green size 11 seed beads
  • 4 matte bronze size 11 seed beads
  • 2 green size 11 seed beads
  • 2 green size 8 seed beads

 

 

Copper Spine Olive and Copper Spiral: Start each spiral with 9 beads:

  • 3 olive lined size 15 seed beads
  • 2 matte bronze size 11 seed beads
  • 2 matte olive size 8 seed beads
  • 2 matte copper size 6 seed beads

 

courtesy of Jennifer VanBenschoten of Beading Daily

 

If you want video instructions, I recommend Potomac Bead Company’s video “Cellini Spiral Stitch (Introduction)” that you can link to here. Say, you need somewhere to buy those beads and crystals for this fabulous project! So why don’t you head over to Eureka Crystal Beads to buy them? They have Toho’s in 20 gram tubes, and superduos in 25 gram quantities for unbelievably low prices! They are based in Rhode Island and my orders to Alabama from them usually arrive within 2-3 days max. That’s how fast their shipping is!

 

Anyway, that is IT for me for this week. Pain meds are kicking in and I need a nap! Besides, the grandbabies will be arriving soon, and that means a LOT of work for my hubby! Ha! I guess there are some benefits to having part of your jawbone cut out and grafted back on! Please don’t forget to leave me some comments. Show me some love, people! I want to know what tutorials you need to see, and suggestions for what you want me to do, not do, whatever! Also, don’t forget to sign up in that little box thing that floats around this page depending on what kind of device you’re on to get my snark delivered straight up and first to your email inbox each and every posting. You never know when I might throw out a bonus post that doesn’t get posted on social media!

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca

12 thoughts on “Sarcasm does Cellini (with a tutorial!)”

  1. You are hilarious! I’m next door in GA, and I know what you mean about the snow panic. And why do people buy milk and bread? Are they going to make milk sandwiches? 😉 Looking forward to more of your posts. I just recently joined the bead group you’re in on FB. Can’t wait to attempt a teapot. Enjoy! Betsy

    • Thank you! I get my sense of humor from my Dad, so he would be tickled pink to read your comment! And I think the milk part is maybe for cooking (if we had power) and the kids? Be sure to check out the multitudes of other beading groups on Facebook too, including Seed Bead Art & Jewelry!

  2. I have done Cellini that reverses simply by reversing the order of adding the beads. Instead of adding the bead that you are coming out of, you switch to adding the bead you are going into. No turning the thread around, and you can do it multiply times easily.

    • My photo is of Jill Wiseman’s Wave Crest which does both. Due to copyright infringements, I can only direct you to her video for instructions on how to make that happen. The link to her how-to video is provided in my blog though. Hope this helps!

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