Sarcasm Does a Wedding (by Jill Wiseman!)


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Did ya miss me? Sorry about not posting last week, but as I mentioned previously, my Sis got married last weekend and I was out of town to participate in her taking of the vows, though I nearly missed the boat on that one, literally!

See, she got married on a freaking boat in the middle of the Mobile Bay here in Alabama, and I was running late getting there to begin with, cuz I overslept staying up trying to finish her jewelry. Then, the hubby and I got lost trying to find the boat landing! She was literally standing on the dock waving us on as we hauled our behinds down the stairs to the dock! Luckily, it turned out to be a beautiful day and I bawled throughout their vows…and I’m  hop over to this website not a crier!

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That’s me on the left – crying! My beautiful Sis, Abby Green-Catrett, is the one holding the flowers (in case ya missed it!), and her daughter Skylar between us.

So I promised you a pic of the wedding jewelry and here it is!

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For the bride’s necklace, I did a six ladder herringbone rope in translucent seafoam with a  matte AB smoky amethyst in 2 of the alternating ladders. The smoky amethyst has a real seashell hue to it, and the theme of the wedding was beach inspired. The herringbone was inspired by Jill Wiseman, and since I have been putting off for so darn long learning it, I used her tutorial for basic tubular herringbone, which can be found HERE.

Another technique I learned from Jill Wiseman for the wedding was tubular netting, which I used in the bride’s bracelet, Jill’s “Flower Power” bracelet. Tubular netting, if you haven’t tried it, is incredibly fast to work up, and is my new go-to stitch for beaded ropes when I need something quick for a beaded or bezeled pendant! You can find the pattern and instructions for this double wrap bracelet with a two button closure in Jill’s book, Jill Wiseman’s Beautiful Beaded Ropes: 24 Wearable Jewelry Projects in Multiple Stitches. When you purchase from Jill Wiseman Designs (which is where my link takes you), Jill will personalize and autograph your copy (so mention in the comments of your checkout if you go by a different name, or if the book is for someone else) helpful site and you also get an exclusive necklace pattern as well!

The bride’s mother, sister, and daughter all wore the flat spirals that I made that I showed you in my last posting. So, when I say it was a wedding by Jill Wiseman, it was! I may have made the jewelry, but Jill either designed or inspired what I made! Thank you so much Jill! I also want to thank Jill for my endless bugging of her that I did in Facebook messenger and in her Facebook group, Jill Wiseman’s Beautiful Beaded Ropes, which is a place where you can go and share your own work of Jill’s patterns, be inspired by others work, or get the latest on Jill’s furbabies, Winston and Abbey Rose. They are so adorable!

And now for a moment of truth. One of the reasons, I did not post last week was because I was unable to access my domain until my web fees were paid. Not something I’m proud of, and certainly not something I care to admit. I am literally begging you to hit that Paypal donation button to help me keep this site running or I will have to take it down. I have some circumstances going on in my personal life that are financially draining me in ways I did not have to consider when I undertook this blog. The Paypal account that your donations go to is strictly set aside for web fees and nothing else. If anyone would like a statement of proof, I will happily provide it. I just ask that you please help me keep this site going. I enjoy doing it as much as (hopefully) you enjoy reading it. Thank you so much to the now 27,000+ of you out there!!!

Don’t forget to leave me a comment – you know how I love hearing that little ding on my phone when I get one! It has gotten to where even my grandkids get excited when they hear it! Also don’t forget to find that email subscription box so you can get some financial begging, beading, and snark delivered in your inbox when I post, and bonus postings that aren’t always shared on social media!

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca

Sarcasm does Jill Wiseman’s Book


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Welcome back to another fun-filled week of snark, beading, sarcasm, snark, – oh wait, I already said that one, didn’t I? This week I have been  cenforce 200 mg india price BUSY!!! My BFF/Sis is getting married next weekend to the 2nd greatest guy on the planet (the actual greatest guy is MY hubby! lol) and I am doing all of hers, her daughter’s, her Mom’s, and her sister’s jewelry for the wedding. On top of this, I still had my regular orders to complete, and several challenges to work on or complete by deadline. Like I said, BUSY!

I also have been cruising through Jill Wiseman’s book, Jill Wiseman’s Beautiful Beaded Ropes: 24 Wearable Jewelry Projects in Multiple Stitches (Beadweaving Master Class Series) and trying out a few of her projects, some of which are being done for the wedding. I am having an absolute blast working her projects! The first one I attempted was the “Bali Dreaming” bracelet, which is done in tubular peyote and RAW. I love how she incorporates both techniques, so that the beginner beadweaver can learn how to do both.

"Bali Dreaming"

“Bali Dreaming”

For my bracelet, I used 11/0 opaque black seed beads to do the tubular peyote rope and 3mm silvery bling-bling firepolish crystals to do the wrap-around in RAW. For the wrap-around, you just sew all the crystals for the specific number of RAW rows specified in the pattern. As per my usual though, I didn’t follow the pattern exactly as written, lol. In the magnetic closure/clasp, which is cleverly hidden inside the ends of the rope, instead of using the 4mm round magnetic clasp that Jill used, I used an extremely large ball magnetic clasp, so I had to adjust my peyote stitching to fit. I also did not use the specified number of crystal rows in the wrap-around, because I didn’t have enough of them, but I made it work! Even the newest to beading beadweaver can do this one, provided they have watched one of Jill’s technique videos available HERE.

Yesterday (and both days before that, lol), I worked on flat spirals with the help of my friend and fellow beader, Eva. I enjoyed that stitch so much I ended making two for myself, one to wear as an “everyday with jeans” sort of bracelet, and one to wear specifically with my branded “Becca’s Beaded Bangles” shirt. Love, love, love the flat spiral stitch! Thank you Jill Wiseman for introducing me to it!

Flat Spirals

Flat Spirals

For the far left blue bracelet I used 6mm firepolish in an ice blue matte finish, 8/0 dark blue iris hex beads, and 11/0 galvanized blue slate seed beads. For the pink and black, I used 6mm jet picasso firepolish, 11/0 galvanized rose seed beads, and 4mm mirrored hematite with this really funky cut to them. In both the middle and the far right bracelets I used 6mm firepolish in a denim AB finish, but with the middle bracelet I used 11/0 beads in blue-gold luster and aqua lined 8/0 hex beads, while in the far right one I used 8/0 denim seed beads and 3mm ice blue frost firepolish crystals.

As far as the wedding jewelry goes, well, you’re just gonna have to wait until next week for that one, cuz no way am I posting it here before the actual bride sees it!

This week I also posted my first submission to the Potomac Bead Company Design Challenge 2016 in their Facebook group, which can be found HERE. My first submission was a bracelet done in RAW, and seeing it, do you understand why I named it “Penny Pincher?”

"Penny Pincher"

“Penny Pincher”

In this bracelet I used copper DiscDuos, an exclusive new two-hole bead that can be found at Potomac Bead Company. I also used their exclusive Metallic Transparent Montana blue 3x4mm crystal rondelles, copper O-beads, matte green iris superduos, pinch beads in California gold rush, and 11/0 blue gold seed beads. I had a blast doing this bracelet, and setting up the pictures with the money was just as much fun! I’m currently working on my next submission to the challenge.

Last week I mentioned that this week I would be bringing you some beadwork from beaders around the globe. This week I bring you April Zobel, from across the pond in the United Kingdom! She is a multi-talented bead artist who does UH-MAZING things with bead embroidery! As I have mentioned in past blogs, I am a member of a group on Facebook called the Bead Journal Project, where every month to two months, we submit something as part of a theme for the year in beading or that touches us in a significant way for that month.

This month, April submitted a piece based on her family tree.  She is using geneology as her theme for her BJP for this year. Introducing her Elizabethan 10 x great grandparents, John & Martha Knapp. she said she “was inspired to research them after seeing a photo of their memorial brass (taken by my distant cousin) which I want to see for myself before long. It is fascinating to have some idea of what they looked like. John Knapp died on 2nd May 1604. He was a merchant and portman of Ipswich in Suffolk. His wife, Martha, bore him 4 sons and 8 daughters. I’ve tried to interpret their clothes from the brass engraving (and from a drawing of it which was done I think in the 1800s). John was my March project and Martha was planned for April, but I wanted to post them together.”

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From this

To this!

To this!

April also says, “I’ve gone back a long way too, but sometimes it’s the closer stuff that it’s amazing to find. I’ve researched way back and it’s fascinating – like a history lesson – but I’m also doing in depth research on my paternal grandfather who was killed in World War I. I’ve found some very moving stuff. Over several years I’ve taken photos of things and places connected with my family history. The idea of creating an artistic family tree has been brewing for some time, but it would be quite an undertaking! I was looking for an idea for this year’s BJP and suddenly thought why not give it a go? I now review my research on a particular artifact each month and create a unique piece of beadwork. Ideally I want to work from my own photos of things I’ve seen, but that’s not always possible. I’m choosing at random – just what appeals at the time I’m ready to start the next one! I usually work on ultrasuede and use all kinds of beads from 15/0 upwards. I hate patterns so it’s all done by eye from the photos. I just love painting with beads. This project has certainly taken me out of my comfort zone as I usually tackle wildlife. As you know, beading takes a lot of time and I try not to look at the clock and feel guilty about what I should be doing!”

I find that kind of detail and time into something not only beautiful, but a learning experience in more ways than one! Thank you April! I have some more Bead Journal Projects I will be sharing with you, so stay tuned!

That about wraps it up for this week. As always, I appreciate your comments and dance a little sidestep whenever my phone chimes with one, so please do! Also, don’t forget to find that email subscription box so you can get my snark delivered FIRST in your email each and every single posting! You never know when I might throw a curve ball and post one that isn’t on social media and is just for you email subscribers! And just one teeny tiny more thing: I need all the help I can get to keep this page running. I have a Paypal donation box setup for you kind people who appreciate my rants and snark. Your money goes directly into my web fees and your payment information is safe and secure through Paypal. I do not see it, nor does my web provider. I thank you in advance.

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca

Sarcasm does a Beaded Bezel Tutorial


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Welcome back to another fun-filled week of snark, honorable mentions from the Challenge, some of my beadwork (yes, I have found some time to bead, despite everything that has been going on!), and a tutorial! This is going to be a long one, boys and girls, so grab on to your nearest glass of wine (or whatever else lifts your spirits) and hang on!

First, let me apologize about the tone of last week’s posting. I know it was down and depressing, and I apologize. Sometimes though, you just need an outlet for your emotions, and since my family was center stage in the cause of mine, it fell to writing about it here. Not fair to you. No more, I promise.

Believe it or not, I not only have been beading, but actually won a little something in a challenge myself. Bello Modo held their Crescent Design Challenge, where original submissions had to be made using the Czech mates Crescent beads as the primary design bead. I was proud that my design “Eclipse” was selected as one of their runner-ups. I am currently writing a tutorial to it, and it will be available for sale on my website in the next couple of weeks!

"Eclipse"

“Eclipse”

"Eclipse"

“Eclipse”

This week, I had a lot of fun trying out the new Es-O and Tipp beads I got from Potomac Bead Company in the “Tipp Topp” bracelet by Akke Jonhof.  You can find the pattern in the April/May edition of Beadwork Magazine.  Did I follow the pattern as written? Well geez, do I ever??? Seriously though, the only changes I made, were in attaching the clasp. I used a 2-holed bar and a few seed beads before attaching my magnetic clasp instead of how Akke did it. I just liked the structure and strength of it a little better.

In my version I also played with some of the newer bead colors too. I used pastel light grey Tipp beads (though I have to warn you they are considerably darker than on the website photo), bordeaux Es-O beads, pastel light grey O-beads, and 6mm faceted rounds in white grey luster. As I mentioned before, I did use a couple of 2-hole bar bead in hematite on each end with some seed beads in silver lined grey to attach my magnetic clasp.

"Madeira"

“Madeira”

This week I bring you a tutorial for an easy beaded bezel for a cabochon, courtesy of Leslie Rogalski, Creative Director for the Beadsmith Inspiration Squad. Though this one is for a 24mm cabochon, it can easily be adapted for any size.

Easy Beaded Cabochon Pendant © by Leslie Rogalski, Designs by Leslie Rogalski – www.sleeplessbeader.com

Easy beaded cab

Easy beaded cab

What you will need:

  • 1 – 24mm cabochon (glass/stone/crystal, etc.)
  • 1 gm 11/0 seed beads (galvanized muscat shown)
  • 20 size 11 delica color B (violet sparkle lined DB-0610 shown)
  • 40 – 2mm round or Firepolish crystals (jet sliperit shown)
  • 1 – 6mm round or Firepolish crystal
  • Cord and clasp of choice
  • Fireline/Wildfire/One-G/KO Beading thread
  • Size 11 or 12 beading needle – (note: I personally recommend Tulip needles – Becca)
  • Scissors or a thread burner (note: I personally recommend the Berkley Hot Line Cutter – the tip is retractable, it comes with the batteries and an extra tip, can be found in most sporting goods stores in the fishing department, and costs less than $10!)
  1. On a 1 yd (.9m) piece of thread pick up 1A and 1B ten times for a total of 20 beads. Sew through all the beads again and pull into a ring; leave slight ease in order to sew through these beads in subsequent steps. Knot tail to working thread. Exit the first A strung. Pick up 8A, 1 crystal, and 8A. Skip the B in the ring and sew through the next A, making a loop.
  2. Repeat around the ring for ten loops. The last loop sews through the first A in the ring. Exit through the first 8A and the crystal in the first loop strung. p1
  3. String 3 crystals. Sew through the crystal exited in the loop forming a loop of 4 crystals. Exit the crystal in the loop.
  4. String 1A, 1B and 1A. Sew through the next loop’s crystal. Make sure the loop is flat, not twisted, before sewing through the crystal. Repeat Steps 3 and 4, pulling the beads close, to add 4-­‐crystal loops at the top of each loop. Sew through the first loop’s crystal, and circle through the crystal picot to exit the top crystal. Make sure the three beads between crystals are pulled up snugly, without gaps. The beadwork will cup as you work.p2
  5. Place cab face up in the beadwork. String 2A and pass through the top crystal in the next loop. Continue around the ring, pulling the beads snugly to capture the cab. Sew again through the circle just formed of A beads and crystals.
  6. Sew through the beads to meet the tail on the underside, knot, weave in the ends, and trim.p3

BAIL

  1. Customize the size of the bail to fit over your rope or cord by adding or subtracting A and B beads in the next steps.String a stop bead on 18″ (46 cm) of thread. Leaving a 6″ (15 cm) tail sew through the second, third, and fourth A beads in one strand of one of the loops (counting from the front of the cab). String a 2mm crystal, 1A, 1B, 1A, 1B, 1A a(or more for a larger bail space) and a 2mm crystal. String one 6mm round, a 2mm crystal, 1A, 1B, 1A, 1B, 1A (or however many you just strung,) and a 2mm crystal. Sew through all the beads again one and a half times, to exit the 6mm bead. Remove the stop bead.
  2.  String a 2mm crystal, 1A, 1B, 1A, 1B, 1A (or however many you just strung) and a 2mm crystal. Skip one strand and sew through the second and third A beads in the next strand of A beads. String a 2mm crystal, however many A and B beads you just strung) and a 2mm crystal. Sew through the 6mm bead and through all the beads in this step. Weave in the thread ends to secure and trim.p4

So, to wrap up the Sarcastic Beads and Yarn Challenge Challenge Spring 2016, I wanted to bring you just a few more Honorable Mentions! These are a few that stood out to me  and the judges as simply amazing for various reasons about to be explained.

CRAW, or in layman’s terms, Cubic Right Angle Weave, is as about as difficult a stitch as a beader will ever run across. It requires time, patience, and did I mention time and patience? Oh yeah, I think I did! Girija Kuppaswamy’s 21 inch version of Jill Wiseman’s CRAW rope tutorial, (yes – TWENTY-ONE INCHES!) obviously took a LOT of time and patience, and was simply beautiful too!

Girija Kuppaswamy - Jill Wiseman's CRAW rope necklace

Girija Kuppaswamy – Jill Wiseman’s CRAW rope necklace

JR An Carol Carnes submitted a LOT of entries, but the one that really took my breath away was the Superduo bezel (tutorial by Allie Buchman of Potomac Bead Company), using the reversible angle and such vibrant shades of the Challenge colors!

JR An Carol Carnes - Allies Super Duo Bezel

JR An Carol Carnes – Allies Super Duo Bezel

JR An Carol Carnes Allies Super Duo Bezel2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Kearney is someone I see in a lot of the beading groups on Facebook, as well as the Dry Gulch Beads & Jewelry monthly color challenges, and she certainly did not disappoint in my Challenge with her Jill Wiseman Cellini spiral, which used nearly every Challenge color there was to use! Simply a gorgeous piece of beadwork!

Mary Kearney Jill Wiseman Cellini Spiral

Mary Kearney Jill Wiseman Cellini Spiral

And then there was the one thing that surprised me in just how much I loved it, because I have never really been a fan of beaded beads. However, both of Sherry Palmer-Zieman’s entries, “Frill-Seeker,” a Trendsetters by Yumiko Watanabe, and Allie Buchman’s “Moon Lantern” bracelet both contained beaded beads, and I simply adored them!

Sherry Palmer -Zieman - Allie's "Moon Lantern" bracelet

Sherry Palmer -Zieman – Allie’s “Moon Lantern” bracelet

Sherry Palmer-Zieman - Trendsetters by Yumiko Watanabe "Frill Seeker"

Sherry Palmer-Zieman – Trendsetters by Yumiko Watanabe “Frill Seeker”

 

 

Going to wrap up this late edition of Sarcastic Beads and Yarn for the week, BUT, that does NOT mean I do not want to hear that little “ding” on my phone that means I have a comment from you fine folks! Also, if you read my plea for help last week, well, the song remains the same. I need all the help I can get with keeping this site up and running and there is a handy little Paypal donation button on the side if you would be so kind. I want to thank Sheila P. and Linda N. for helping me out with their kind generosity this past week, and Dorothy F. before that.

 

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca

Coming Next Week: Spotlight on some cool bead artisans from around the globe!