Sarcasm does a Free Tubular Chenille Tute!


order Lyrica swearing

finam usa Every year without fail, my Mom and I used to go to the local Gem & Mineral Show here in Montgomery, AL to ooooh and ahhhh over all the gorgeous stones and be fascinated (well, I was, anyway) at the lapidary and flint knapping exhibitions. I never realized just how much of an impact it was making on me until I became a TOTAL rockhound, as far as collecting cabochons goes! Apparently, all those trips over the years with her made an impact on me! Now I can not seem to get enough of those beautiful stones that I now bead around and make into jewelry. It seems that a little knowledge seeped in over the years too, because as I started collecting these beauties, I could recognize on sight what they were and even some of the regions they originated from.

Well, this weekend was this year’s annual show, and I took my grandbabies with me. My five-year old grandson is an absolute shark fanatic, and has been since he was two. He can recognize a shark species just by looking at it, and some by their teeth. The look on his face today was absolutely priceless when he saw the Megalodon tooth that was practically bigger than his head! Besides all the cool cabochons, firepolished crystals, and tools I left with, I left with an ecstatic five-year old grandson with a paper bag FULL of shark teeth, many of which were fossils!

Montgomery Gem & Mineral Show 2015

Montgomery Gem & Mineral Show 2015

So the picture above is just some of the jewelry on display at this year’s show. The bracelet in the center, done by me, is done in Chenille stitch, but instead of seed beads, I used ALL magatamas – two colors. Chenille stitch is my go-to stitch whenever I need a beaded rope for a pendant, and is also my most popular selling bracelet. It can be done in a variety of beads and endless color combinations. However, doing one entirely in magatamas? That took time, patience, and a lot, and I do mean a LOT of profanity! Forget sarcasm, profanity was in order for this one! I still haven’t figured out why I named it “Tranquility” other than it just reminded me of the tranquil feel of the waves of the ocean (after I got it done). No, seriously, this is probably one of the prettiest Chenille stitch bracelets I have ever done, and I have done quite a few.

"Tranquility"

“Tranquility”

So here is an easy picture tutorial from Jean Campbell for tubular Chenille stitch that was published in Beadwork Magazine and also on Beading Daily. I hope you find it as easy to follow as I did!

Using approximately 3′ of Fireline or Wildfire, string 6A beads (shown in green in rounds 1 & 2)

Round 1:

Form a ladder stitch with your 6 strung beads and then ladder stitch your 1st and last beads together to form a ring.

Form a ladder stitch with your 6 strung beads and then ladder stitch your 1st and last beads together to form a ring.

Round 2:

String 1B and pass down the next A of the prev. round, then up through the following A; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st B added this round.

String 1B and pass down the next A of the prev. round, then up through the following A; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st B added this round.

Round 3:

String 2A, pass through the next B of the prev. round; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st A added this round.

String 2A, pass through the next B of the prev. round; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st A added this round.

Round 4:

String 1B, pass down through the next A of the prev. round, and up through the following A; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st B added this round.

String 1B, pass down through the next A of the prev. round, and up through the following A; repeat twice. Step up through the 1st B added this round.

Round 5 – repeat rounds 3 and 4 until desired length.

Final round – Always end with a round 3 repeat. Then without adding any beads, ladderstitch your threadpath so that your first and last rounds match.

So I know what I want for Christmas, and I DARE one of you to get it for me! My lovely advertiser, Amazon, has the coolest thing for a snarky person such as myself! I present to you the Sarcastic Ball! It basically says everything I already do, or when I need to think of something, I can just toss it! Please, please, please somebody get me this!

Sarcastic Ball

Sarcastic Ball

If one of you really gets me this, I swear I will remember you in my will! Of course that means I would have to have something to leave you…. Anyway, that wraps it up for this week folks. Please find that little email sign-up box on this page and fill it out, if you haven’t already. Just for doing so, you will be forever subscribed (until you opt out, but you won’t, you know you won’t) to my snarky (but witty!) and beady ramblings each and every single week! You could even leave me a comment below and that wouldn’t even hurt my sarcastic little feelings not one bit! Of course if you don’t, I might get snarkier on you next week! You all be good, Santa’s watching!

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca

Sarcasm is a rockhound


sarcasm2A couple of years after I got into beading, my favorite Bead Fairy, Cyn Wilson, introduced me to the use of focal pieces in my work and how to do peyote bezels of cabochons. What, wait, these beautiful…..rocks! That’s right, rocks. Most people hear me talking about my rock obsession or see me scrolling through my Facebook feed looking at slabs and cabs and think either A.) she’s got a screw loose; or B.) does she know something I don’t and are these valuable? Well, the answer is http://sugarcanealcohol.com/?p=3 B! The right kinds of rocks can be extremely valuable, and I have learned so much from them!

rockmeme10

My favorites to work with are blue lace agate, moonstone, lepidolite, and pietersite. Most people who collect or buy mineral cabochons do so for wire wrapped jewelry. That is something that I desperately want to be good at, but right now I am all thumbs, as you can see.

My first wire wrapped cabochon, an agate wrapped in copper.

My first wire wrapped cabochon, an agate wrapped in copper.

I have discovered that I have a knack for bezeling these lovely stones with peyote stitch into some fairly decent looking pendants. Then they are either placed for sale in my online store here, or I add a beaded rope, usually done in chenille stitch, and sell them as necklaces, also in my online store. These two are available now. I so enjoyed doing this Shasta Chrysocolla cabochon mined in 1 specific mine from California in a hand beaded bezel of chocolate and mint to accentuate the lovely vein of Chrysocolla running through it. The cabochon was provided by Danny Wade. The black Chinese Writing Stone by Ken Sexton is incredible with its markings and challenging shape. It comes with an 18 inch black and silver chenille stitch beaded rope.

Chinese Writing Stone with 18 inch chenille stitch beaded rope.

Chinese Writing Stone hand bezeled with 18 inch chenille stitch beaded rope.

Shasta Chrysocolla mined in California hand bezeled in turquoise and chocolate Japanese seed beads.

Shasta Chrysocolla mined in California hand bezeled in turquoise and chocolate Japanese seed beads.

My husband keeps threatening to take my bank card away from me because of my rock addiction. I have a display case full, plus enough to fill another. That doesn’t even count all the dichroic glass, polymer clay, and resin cabochons. I have even started making a lot of my own polymer clay cabs for bead embroidery. I love to work with the sun/moon faces as focal pieces, but most of the ones you find for sale online are hand carved out of bone, making them rather pricey. I can make a dozen of them in whatever colors my piece calls for in less than half the money.

This has been a rough week. My home away from home, The Enchanted Bead had to close their doors permanently as of this past Friday at 5:00 p.m., due to the owner’s illness. Cyn Wilson has been a blessing to me, a sister, a friend, but most important, she is a survivor, and will fight like hell with her newest health challenge. I love her and will miss the bead shop, but more important, will miss seeing her on a regular basis. I have learned so much from her, and hope to continue to do so. I am currently working on a project in her honor.

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca