Sarcasm Talks ©opyrights


30 best sassy quotes

In this extremely overdue post, Sarcasm talks copyrights, more specifically about being more information bullied by other like-minded beaders and crafters who are (like I am on most subjects) a little confused by copyrights and how they apply to their particular craft. You all (hopefully!) read my reviews of the bead boards I did a while ago, and how two particular makers of said beading tool has been sending ummmm well frankly, threats in the form of emails, public social media posts, you get the drift, threatening legal action, claiming that the bead board was originally their own idea, yours are just knock-offs, yada, yada, yada.

http://fishingthefraser.com/tours/9-foot-6-sturgeon-with-brant really owe all of you apologies for not posting in such a long while, but I am having some pretty intense health issues, to the point that I am unable to even beading on a regular basis [sce emoji=”sadness”/]. In fact, if trips to the emergency room and doctors earned frequent flyer miles I could have circled the globe a few times over! [sce emoji=”facepalm”/] The new medication that the doctors want me on is so new, my insurance doesn’t cover it, so that means you just “might” want to click on the “Donation  to Paypal” button at the very top of the page! [sce emoji=”nod”/] I can not afford it. Plain and simple.

Now, back to the copyright issues for any type of crafter. To, again use the bead board tool as an example, I received tons of messages, emails, and comments about how some form or another of the bead board had been around by other makers, and for that matter, literally centuries. There is even an authentic Native American bead board in the Smithsonian Museum’s National Museum of the American Indian. (Sorry Bead On it and Silaba, but you did NOT invent the bead board tool.) I even have a picture of my Cherokee Great-Great Grandmother using hers. Fortunately, I have been informed by what has turned into a literal network of crafters and bloggers that I am not the first (and there have been more since) person literally bullied about copyrights. As it turns out, the one who hollers the loudest about it is the one who never got one to begin with, because it was turned down by the U.S. Copyright office several times.

There is a HUGE amount of misinformation about copyrights floating around the crafters and artistic communities, and why we have copyrights. In Article 1, Section 8, of the U.S. Constitution, congress is empowered “to promote the progress of Science and Useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors, the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”  To understand U.S. Copyright law, it helps to understand their purpose, as presented in our Constitution. It isn’t about promoting the individual artists and poets. It is about promoting progress, by limiting rights to ONLY creators of certain works, for a limited time something that is in our society’s best interest (even though that limit is 70 years past death of the original artist)! Progress is a GOOD thing, remember?

intellectual property

It is also helpful to understand exactly what can (and cannot) be copyrighted. According to the U.S. copyright website: “Copyright does not protect ideas, concepts, systems, or methods of doing something. You may express your ideas in writing or drawings and claim copyright in your description, but be aware that copyright will not protect the idea itself as revealed in your written or artistic work.” To be more precise, Section 102(b) of the U.S. Copyright Act states: “In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work.” In plain English: Your words and your pictures are your own, and next page no one has the right to censor your own expression of an idea, but a craft item, tool, or procedure is NOT copyrightable!

There is plenty, and I mean PLENTY of circulars and other helpful information about copyrights HERE. I strongly encourage you (especially if you are a designer who writes and illustrates tutorials) to familiarize  yourself with as much copyright knowledge as you can squeeze into your brain.

In a nutshell, if you or the original crafter/artist/designer have been deceased for 70+ years, and you come up with something  new or not so new, PUBLISH IT right away. Whether or not you have the little “c” in a circle does NOT matter. It’s yours – claim it! From the moment you publish it – anywhere, whether it be in print, the internet, or written on a scrap of paper, it is YOURS and will remain so until 70 years after your death, unless your descendants file for an extension. Period.

Until next time (and it will be a few weeks due to hospitalization), say smart or stay smart sassy!

Becca

 

Sarcasm Reviews a Dilly of a Bead Board!


train

Welcome back to another fun-filled week of sarcasm, beads, my life (or lack thereof – Ha!), and yet another installment in my reviews of that wonderful tool we beaders love – the bead board! I took a week off from blogging to deal with some crapola going on in my personal life, but also to try out the board I will be reviewing here today.

I also spent the week car shopping, and have mercy, I absolutely despise that whole, sitting in the little plastic chair, waiting on the finance people to work their magic with the numbers thing that takes pretty much all freaking afternoon/morning/evening – just pick one, cuz they are all pretty much the same! But anyhow, I found what I wanted, so at least there’s that!

I owe you all (and Ruth Ann Miller too!) an apology, as in my last installment about  The Bead Pad, I neglected to give you all the details about prices and sizes. For starters, her 6 inch mini-round board is $22.50 and her 11 inch round is $50.00. Her oval 11×14 board is $55.00, and is the one I actually have and reviewed. Her rectangle boards come in two sizes. There is the standard 9×12 for $50.00, and then she has a table sized one, the “Big Mama” that runs $125.00. She has 18 border colors to choose from and her shipping runs from $7.50 – $19.50, depending on board size. The Bead Corrals that she has to keep your beads in place on the boards are $14.99, and shipping for those is $5.50.

The Bead Pad

The Bead Pad

Now, on to this week’s installment! A couple of weeks ago I came home from volunteering at my grandson’s school and found where my hubby had left a package in my chair on his way to work that was marked as coming air freight from across the pond in the U.K. Upon opening it, I found the Curved Mega Tray version of Silaba Crafts beading board, a “Gilly,” a set of “Dilly Pads,” and “Dilly Dots.” To say the folks at Silaba were generous would be a serious overstatement, and buh-leeve me it was an overstatement, because as soon as they found out that another business in the U.S. was making them (which was in process LONG before my review came out) they demanded I ship their things back to them ASAP (despite INSISTING in an email that I keep them with their compliments to avoid the cost of returning them, which was nearly $80). They were NOT nice about it, either, even going as far as to slander me personally on social media and some other private messaging.

So what is a curved bead board? It is a 12×18 beading board that is shaped kind of like an upside down boomerang. It is very lightweight, lighter than any bead board I have had so far, (probably because it is much thinner as it had nearly NO padding) fits around your waist while you are sitting in your favorite recliner, on the sofa, etc. The surface mat is a light-colored blanket material, and the border material is a stretch fabric that although not waterproof, when the sweat from my glass dripped on it the other night, it beaded up instead of soaking in and leaving a stain. There is no problem with any beads getting stuck in the crevices between the bumper and the surface either. If they roll down, just push down on the mat and they pop back up on the board again, just as with the Bead Wrangler boards.

I have been using this bead board/craft tray at night while watching TV, as it fits perfectly around my waist, with room for all of my beads and tools on it because I don’t have to worry about either beads or tools going anywhere if I shift around because of the “Dilly Pads and Dots” that came with the board. They are basically little teeny-weeny bead mats with a ring inside to keep your beads in place – on ONE side. The other side is backed in felt to hold your tools in place. The “Dilly Dots” are just a smaller version of the pads. They are all cut to fit in the curve of your bead board. Forget it if you have a square or rectangular board – they just don’t fit. Another problem is they get SO dirty so quickly!

So, in addition to all of that, I received the “Gilly,” a small 8×5 board. What is so cool about it? Not all that much. It comes with its own padded cover with built-in double-sectioned Dilly pads on the inside of it, and sewn on very thin (and will eventually rip) elastic straps that hook together to keep it closed. It is the perfect size for those really large purses. It still has the wooden base though (making your purse quite bulky and much heavier), but it also has a rim to it to keep those beads from going too far. It is ok for travel beading unless you are in the car and the rim is so small that the beads go flying with the first bump in the road or an airplane and hit any turbulence. I still love and MUCH prefer my Bead Wrangler 8 inch board better because there is more surface room to bead and a larger rim for those pesky bumps in the road!

Both the large board and the Gilly offer a slight (and I mean SLIGHT) amount of padding for your wrists and to stick your needles when not in use without fear of breaking them, though they will bend them. They are easily cleaned with one of those masking tape type lint rollers or lightly dampened cloth, just as the Bead Wrangler is.

Silaba’s boards are available in square, oval, oblong, round, rectangle, and the curved shapes, ranging in sizes from 7 1/2×12 to 12×18. They offer 40 choices in border fabric selections (far too many to choose from IMO). Prices range from $36.42 – $101.45, depending on size/shape, and shipping ranges from $9.10 – $19.51 which is via Airmail, which takes a couple of weeks (mine took nearly three weeks to get here), while the Bead Wrangler is usually just a couple of days. The “Gilly” is available in nine color selections and is $36.42 plus $9.10 shipping. (All amounts are in USD). All in all, not bad pricewise, but shipping time kinda stinks, considering it’s coming from across the pond, however I do believe in American-made and supporting OUR small businesses!

And speaking of great bead boards, The Bead Wrangler has added two new products to her line. The first one is a mini board that’s 7×12 inches. Several customers wanted one that would fit into a bag and take up less space. It is available in all 16 trim choices. The second new product is the ONLY one of its kind, and is just freaking AWESOME! It is a TWO-sided bead board!

doubles

The Double-Sided Bead Wrangler Bead Board

Many beaders prefer a lighter beading surface but occasionally, they will have a pattern or design using all light beads which may be more difficult to see on the lighter surface. This “reversible” board is the only one of its kind! You’ll have the lighter surface AND the darker surface on the same board! The best part? It is only $10 more ($60) for the double-sided board! Now if you think this is awesome, just wait until you see what else she has coming out!

So far I have reviewed the Bead On It Boards,  The Bead PadSilaba Crafts curved craft tray, and my personal favorite (and the least expensive and best made)  The Bead Wrangler. I have reached out to one more seller on Etsy, and Ruby Lockwood, if you are reading this, please get in touch! ALL of the boards that I have reviewed thus far are significantly less expensive than the Bead On It boards. In a side by side comparison The Bead Wrangler wins, hands down in my book, especially with the free monogram! Moral of these reviews: Bead On It Boards are made by Canadians, Silaba in the UK. If you ARE an American then BUY American! Support your home country’s businesses when at all possible!

So, if you are wondering if I have any beading to show you this week, I do not. But only because I am keeping it under wraps for a wee bit longer annnndddddd so I can tease you now about it. Ha! As it stands right now, I am headed to beautiful Stone Mountain, Georgia this week to not only bead with a wonderful friend, but to see some of the great new things Ree Stanley, The Bead Wrangler lady has under wraps! ROAD TRIP!!!!! Wheeeeeee!!!

For those of you kind enough to send me information about grandparents rights, advocacy groups, and legal intervention, and for those of you keeping my grandbabies in your prayers and thoughts, I can’t thank you enough, and ask that you continue to do so in the prayer department. You all have been VERY resourceful! I did get a couple of hours with them last Sunday night, but nothing since, except seeing my grandson for a few minutes while I was at his school the other day.

I want to welcome my newest advertiser, Red Door Beads and Gallery! You will find their ad  with a 15% off your ENTIRE purchase over on the left side of the page if you are on a desktop, and down below the comment section on mobile. It’s always nice to find an advertiser with as snarky an attitude as mine! Ha! Seriously though, I consider Viki at Red Door a friend, and everyone knows you can’t be snarky with a straight face with friends! Seriously though, she saved this blog from oblivion, though it is still not out of the woods financially yet, sooooo you know the drill. Hit the Paypal button and please oh please, help me out where and when you can.

That about wraps it up for this week. So, until next time, stay smart or stay smart sassy!

Becca

Sarcasm Posted A Review


I do, I really DO!!!

I do, I really DO!!!

A few days ago I posted a review of a tool a lot of us fellow beaders use, or are at are familiar with – the bead board. My review was only by two makers of the tool, but I am working on getting more to compare. I received some comments here, along with emails, Facebook and Twitter messages regarding The Bead Pad and the bead trays made by Silaba Crafts in the U.K., and would love to try both, and any others that are out there, as well.

Southerly-meme-How-consumers-are-influenced-by-an-online-review

Anyways, I just wanted to post the responses I got from Bead On It Boards and The Bead Wrangler. Honestly, I was only trying to make a comparison of the two tools, as I liked the BOIB, and currently love The Bead Wrangler. A lot of you out there have been making your own trays or boards with picture frames, steering wheel covers, plastic lids, baking sheets, and other materials for years.

I think Dianne Peaslee sums it up well in her comment on Facebook: “Most cultures have had some form of bead board since they started using beads. Native Americans have had them for thousands of years. They weren’t quite as fancy. Really just wood, covered with leather, held together with rawhide, but it did the job of keeping the beads where they were placed until you needed them. I think there is actually one in the Smithsonian’s Native American Collection.”

My response from The Bead Wrangler which can be found here:

bead wrangler post

This is actually the second response from the owner of BOIB. I won’t print the first one, since I have a family friendly site. Besides, she has since deleted it from her page.  From Deidre Pyatte, owner of Bead On It Board, LLC, which can be found here:

Deidre

Thank you all for your comments and your own research, and also for your kind comments regarding “the crater.” As of this morning, I got the official word (after yet another painful debridement) that I can bead (lightly, and with the assistance of good old-fashioned pain pills) again!!!  WOOHOOOO!!!!!!!!!!

Until next time, stay smart, or stay smart sassy!

Becca